Rickshaw or a lounge? you decide

In this modern era of technology, when Uber and Ola have overtaken auto rickshaws, this tuk-tuk still is the centre of attraction among Mumbaikars. It is customised to meet the needs of today's generation. 


We can live without water but not mobile and mobile is worthless without internet so, this auto rickshaw offers free wifi while you take a ride. Low on mobile balance? It has a PCO phone to allow calling. Well, that's not free and no international calling please.

Senior citizens enjoy rides at discounted rates and so do newly married.

Sandeep Bacche, the man who owns the rickshaw flaunts a big tattoo of Bollywood actor Sanja Dutt on his arm. Sanju Bhai helped Sandeep while his mother was fighting with cancer. Since then, Sandeep only swears by Sanju Bhai. 

 Sanjay became Sandeep's fan after Sandeep asked him to discontinue financial and medicinal assistance as his mother had died. 

Sandeep is known for his honesty and big heart as he serves free food to patients in hospitals.

He has a message for all - God is one, no matter what form we see him in. The man with no religion is proud to be INDIAN.
Every day, he updates gold, silver and currency rates on the display board for his customers.

Smoking is injurious to health and smell undesirable to co-passengers, so pick one complimentary sweet for the benefit of both. 

Women and mirror are indivisible. And to make the best use of the mirror, an Oriflame Sweden make up kit is rightly placed in front of the seat. Mind you, this too is complementary.

Newspapers and magazines in this autorickshaw will keep you from boredom.



Indians can't survive without a chai. He carries with him a flask of hot tea which costs Rs 5 a cup.

Mumbai gets India's first LGBT driven cab service



 For Sanjeevani Chauhan's life had never been so easy. From begging at Mumbai traffic lights, she has come to be trained as a driver for India's first taxi service operated by members of LGBT community.

Ganesh Somwanshi, project director for Wings Rainbow says one transgender or a gay person driving the cab in Mumbai has the capability to inspire other transgender begging on the streets. Consequently, they would like to be part of the change.

The LGBT community is badly sidelined despite the fact that they are legally recognised by India.

It took Ganesh around two months to get everyone on board. Post research, they had to identify gays, lesbians and transgender who were willing to be part of the project. They were a little apprehensive as they were afraid customers would use their cab service or take them seriously.

Pallav Patankar, director of programmes at Humsafar said, "Post NALSA judgment, LGBTs were constitutionally given all the rights, but we had to find out ways to implement this on a grassroots level."

He has been working for around 20 years promoting the rights of the LGBT community and empowerment of community through computer literacy classes, vocational training, and convincing corporations to invest in jobs for the LGBT.

"They have a right to work and live like everyone else. We need to build their capability and at the same time sensitise the general public towards accepting them in such roles", said Patankar.




Wings Travel and Humsafar Trust, a Mumbai-based NGO that promotes the rights of India's gay community, launched the pilot phase of the Wings Rainbow initiative by registering Chauhan and four others.

These five members of LGBT community will initially apply for a learner’s licence. In next 9 to 12 months which is the time taken to get a permanent driving license, they will be imparted training on customer etiquette.

Arun Kharat, founder-director of Wings Travels and Management said, “We want them to eventually become entrepreneurs and become owners of these vehicles. We wish to ensure that the LGBT community in India enjoys the same rights and income opportunities in India as their counterparts in western countries.”

According to Mr Kharat, Wings Travels operates roughly 5,500 radio taxis in nine cities. These cities include Pune, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai, Bangalore, Chandigarh, Nagpur and Ahmedabad.

Kharat hopes to enrol 1,500 people from LGBT community across all nine cities.


School where all children are ambidextrous





One child in a million is ambidextrous and can write with both hands. But at a school called Veena Vandini in Singrauli district, it's a custom.

All students of this school can effortlessly write with both hands. The school is up to 8th standard and was started by a former soldier, VP Sharma, on July 8, 1999.

"I was travelling in a bus when I read in a magazine that President Rajendra Prasad could write with both hands. This inspired me a lot and I tried it. Later, I launched Veena Vandini school at my native village, I started training my students and today, we have the results," said Sharma.

"Students receive training after they enter class 1 and by the time they reach class 3, they can efficiently write with both hands. Students of class 7 and 8 can capable of writing with speed and accuracy. Not only that, they can write two scripts at the same time, one with each hand," he said.

The children are taught six languages that include English, Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit, Arabic and Roman.

In a period of forty-five minutes, fifteen minutes are devoted to writing practice.

With the strength of 300 students, the school boasts of 200 students who can effortlessly write with both hands. Rest of the students are still being trained.

Most of the students in the school are either Dalits or tribal. The school is located in a distant area, 15 km from Budhela village. Now, ambidexterity is part of the school routine.